From Pastor Perry

Matthew 21:28–32 (ESV)

The Parable of the Two Sons

28 “What do you think? A man had two sons. And he went to the first and said, ‘Son, go and work in the vineyard today.’ 29 And he answered, ‘I will not,’ but afterward he changed his mind and went. 30 And he went to the other son and said the same. And he answered, ‘I go, sir,’ but did not go. 31 Which of the two did the will of his father?” They said, “The first.” Jesus said to them, “Truly, I say to you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes go into the kingdom of God before you. 32 For John came to you in the way of righteousness, and you did not believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes believed him. And even when you saw it, you did not afterward change your minds and believe him.

 

The important thing is to get the work done.  It is not what comes out of the mouth that is important, but the works that came from the heart.  This seems anti-Lutheran, but it is not.  We are saved by faith alone and it is important to confess with our mouth that Jesus Christ is Lord.  In this parable, one actually does the will of the Lord and one doesn’t.  The Lutheran Study Bible states: “Jesus graphically depicts the obstinance of His opponents and the depth of their sin in rejecting Him. There are times that our stubborn refusals to change our behavior are just as obstinate. In God’s kingdom, no repentant sinner is ever turned away. Repentant tax collectors and prostitutes were welcomed; so are we!

 

I pray:  “Chief of sinners though I be, Jesus shed His blood for me, Died that I might live on high, Lives that I might never die. As the branch is to the vine, I am His, and He is mine.” Amen. (LSB 611:1)

 

 

 

Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009), 1629.

 

Matthew 21:23–27 (ESV)

The Authority of Jesus Challenged

23 And when he entered the temple, the chief priests and the elders of the people came up to him as he was teaching, and said, “By what authority are you doing these things, and who gave you this authority?” 24 Jesus answered them, “I also will ask you one question, and if you tell me the answer, then I also will tell you by what authority I do these things. 25 The baptism of John, from where did it come? From heaven or from man?” And they discussed it among themselves, saying, “If we say, ‘From heaven,’ he will say to us, ‘Why then did you not believe him?’ 26 But if we say, ‘From man,’ we are afraid of the crowd, for they all hold that John was a prophet.” 27 So they answered Jesus, “We do not know.” And he said to them, “Neither will I tell you by what authority I do these things.

 

When His opponents challenge the source of His authority, Jesus exhibits a wisdom that powerfully attests to His status as one sent by God. Like Jesus’ opponents, we sometimes challenge the Lord’s authority and attempt to stand in judgment of Him. But God rightly judges us, not vice versa. Jesus willingly submitted to the authority of those who falsely accused Him and unjustly condemned Him to death. By His death, He won our salvation.

 

 

I pray: Give us grace always to submit to Your authority, O Lord, for it comes from heaven and so can lead us there, where we will reign with You forever. Amen.

 

 

Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009), 1629.

Matthew 21:18–22 (ESV)

Jesus Curses the Fig Tree

18 In the morning, as he was returning to the city, he became hungry. 19 And seeing a fig tree by the wayside, he went to it and found nothing on it but only leaves. And he said to it, “May no fruit ever come from you again!” And the fig tree withered at once.

20 When the disciples saw it, they marveled, saying, “How did the fig tree wither at once?” 21 And Jesus answered them, “Truly, I say to you, if you have faith and do not doubt, you will not only do what has been done to the fig tree, but even if you say to this mountain, ‘Be taken up and thrown into the sea,’ it will happen. 22 And whatever you ask in prayer, you will receive, if you have faith.”

 

What the heck is going on here?  The disciples are trying to figure out what happened to the tree.  They are not looking for the teaching example that Jesus is employing.  They are marveling at how the fig tree withered at once.  Let’s take a deeper look.  The Lutheran Study Bible states: “By cursing a fruitless fig tree, Jesus reveals symbolically God’s judgment against the faithless and fruitless portion of His covenant people. Though we are saved by faith alone, producing fruit for God and His kingdom is not optional. Though faithlessness rightly deserves God’s wrath, God Himself works faithfulness in us and grants a rich reward of blessings.

 

 

I pray:  Lord Jesus, You are the true vine. Apart from You, we can do nothing. Keep us united to You, that we produce abundant fruit to Your glory. Amen.

 

 

 Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009), 1628.

Matthew 21:12–17 (ESV)

Jesus Cleanses the Temple

12 And Jesus entered the temple and drove out all who sold and bought in the temple, and he overturned the tables of the money-changers and the seats of those who sold pigeons. 13 He said to them, “It is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer,’ but you make it a den of robbers.”

14 And the blind and the lame came to him in the temple, and he healed them. 15 But when the chief priests and the scribes saw the wonderful things that he did, and the children crying out in the temple, “Hosanna to the Son of David!” they were indignant, 16 and they said to him, “Do you hear what these are saying?” And Jesus said to them, “Yes; have you never read,

       “ ‘Out of the mouth of infants and nursing babies

you have prepared praise’?”

17 And leaving them, he went out of the city to Bethany and lodged there.

 

Immediately after being acclaimed Messiah, Jesus further provokes the Jewish leaders by driving merchants and money-changers out of the temple. Sometimes financial concerns eclipse the Church’s real priority: faithfully teaching the Word and administering the Sacraments. Jesus responds to our misuse of holy things not by yanking them away from us but rather by correcting us and calling us to receive them worthily, unto faith and salvation.

 

I pray: “Almighty, ever-living God, grant that … all my worship may be acceptable unto Thee; through Jesus Christ, my Lord.” Amen. (TLH, p 4) 

 

Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009), 1628.

Matthew 21:1–11 (ESV)

The Triumphal Entry

21 Now when they drew near to Jerusalem and came to Bethphage, to the Mount of Olives, then Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, “Go into the village in front of you, and immediately you will find a donkey tied, and a colt with her. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, you shall say, ‘The Lord needs them,’ and he will send them at once.” This took place to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet, saying,

   “Say to the daughter of Zion,

       ‘Behold, your king is coming to you,

humble, and mounted on a donkey,

on a colt, the foal of a beast of burden.’ ”

The disciples went and did as Jesus had directed them. They brought the donkey and the colt and put on them their cloaks, and he sat on them. Most of the crowd spread their cloaks on the road, and others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road. And the crowds that went before him and that followed him were shouting, “Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!” 10 And when he entered Jerusalem, the whole city was stirred up, saying, “Who is this?” 11 And the crowds said, “This is the prophet Jesus, from Nazareth of Galilee.”

 

Such a simple act of entering a city becomes quite a celebration!  Jesus knows what is going on… He’s on is way to the cross.  The people??? They think a king has finally come.  Both are true, but Jesus plan of Salvation will be carried through.  This event of entering the city is fulfilling prophecy as well.  Zechariah 9:9 is cited stating: Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion!  Shout aloud, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold, your king is coming to you; righteous and having salvation is he, humble and mounted on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.”  The people were right, the King of Kings was entering the city.  Through the events of Holy Week, it will leave all asking “Who is this?”

 

I pray: O Lord, I know that you are the Messiah, the promised one.  I don’t have to ask “Who is this”, because I know.  Yet even though I know, I still fall short and sin against you.  I repent and want to do better.  Forgive me and restore me.  Amen.

Latest comments

27.05 | 16:27

Pastor: on my e mails, a note said that you were trying to contact me. Now,
I am having trouble reaching you. Was it important? In Christ, daisy

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10.02 | 08:33

Look at the Words say they "fell away". The had it, but lost it. Just like the Bible says your name can be blotted out of the Book of Life.

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10.02 | 08:25

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10.02 | 03:32

I have just begun to start a blog called christTalk as well. Mine is a .com site. I was checking to see if my site was up and this is how i come to find yours.

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