From Pastor Perry

1 Corinthians 16:19–24 (ESV)

Greetings

19 The churches of Asia send you greetings. Aquila and Prisca, together with the church in their house, send you hearty greetings in the Lord. 20 All the brothers send you greetings. Greet one another with a holy kiss. 

21 I, Paul, write this greeting with my own hand. 22 If anyone has no love for the Lord, let him be accursed. Our Lord, come! 23 The grace of the Lord Jesus be with you. 24 My love be with you all in Christ Jesus. Amen.

 

Paul’s bittersweet conclusion illustrates his passion for the Gospel and for the congregation. Likewise, the Lord calls us to passionate service and love. Jesus, too, forcefully denounced those who abused God’s Word (Mt 23:1–36); yet He poured out His love for all sinners, so that all might know His grace.

 

I pray: Dear Jesus, fill me with sincere passion for sharing the Gospel with those who have not yet heard of or believed in Your grace. Amen.

 

 

Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009), 1978.

1 Corinthians 16:12–19 (ESV)

Final Instructions

12 Now concerning our brother Apollos, I strongly urged him to visit you with the other brothers, but it was not at all his will to come now. He will come when he has opportunity. 

13 Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. 14 Let all that you do be done in love. 

15 Now I urge you, brothers—you know that the household of Stephanas were the first converts in Achaia, and that they have devoted themselves to the service of the saints— 16 be subject to such as these, and to every fellow worker and laborer. 17 I rejoice at the coming of Stephanas and Fortunatus and Achaicus, because they have made up for your absence, 18 for they refreshed my spirit as well as yours. Give recognition to such people. 

 

Paul urges the leaders at Corinth to recognize the service, calling, and authority of each other and to see themselves at part of a larger team. No matter how or where you serve the Lord, you, too, are part of a larger team. Respect your fellow workers by listening to them and coordinating efforts with them. Our Savior’s strong, firm love and leadership preserves the unity of His dear Church, for which He gave His life.

 

I pray: Dear Jesus, grant me patience with my colleagues, and direct us ever by Your pure Word so that we may stand firm together by Your grace alone. Amen.

 

 

Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009), 1978.

1 Corinthians 16:1–11 (ESV)

The Collection for the Saints

16 Now concerning the collection for the saints: as I directed the churches of Galatia, so you also are to do. On the first day of every week, each of you is to put something aside and store it up, as he may prosper, so that there will be no collecting when I come. And when I arrive, I will send those whom you accredit by letter to carry your gift to Jerusalem. If it seems advisable that I should go also, they will accompany me. 

Plans for Travel

I will visit you after passing through Macedonia, for I intend to pass through Macedonia, and perhaps I will stay with you or even spend the winter, so that you may help me on my journey, wherever I go. For I do not want to see you now just in passing. I hope to spend some time with you, if the Lord permits. But I will stay in Ephesus until Pentecost, for a wide door for effective work has opened to me, and there are many adversaries. 

10 When Timothy comes, see that you put him at ease among you, for he is doing the work of the Lord, as I am. 11 So let no one despise him. Help him on his way in peace, that he may return to me, for I am expecting him with the brothers.

 

Paul clears the way for future work and for the work of his colleague Timothy. Effective ministry today also depends on clear planning and authority so that congregations may support the work of the Lord. That work is vital because faith, life, and salvation come only through the Lord’s Word.

 

I pray: Dear Jesus, prosper the work of the Lord among us so that Your life-giving Gospel is not despised through sinful disagreement or stubbornness. Lead us to respect and support those who preach the Gospel faithfully. Amen.

 

 

Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009), 1978.

1 Corinthians 15:50–58 (ESV)

Mystery and Victory

50 I tell you this, brothers: flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, nor does the perishable inherit the imperishable. 51 Behold! I tell you a mystery. We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, 52 in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed. 53 For this perishable body must put on the imperishable, and this mortal body must put on immortality. 54 When the perishable puts on the imperishable, and the mortal puts on immortality, then shall come to pass the saying that is written: 

“Death is swallowed up in victory.” 

55 “O death, where is your victory? 

O death, where is your sting?” 

56 The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law. 57 But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. 

58 Therefore, my beloved brothers, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that in the Lord your labor is not in vain.

 

The justification Jesus provided is our only hope against sin, death, and the Law’s condemnation. Jesus delivers us from death’s jaws. He now equips us to serve in His Church and to live eternally in His kingdom.

 

I pray: Victorious Lord, Your nail-pierced hand drew me safely out of sin; Your pierced foot snapped shut the jaws of death. Teach me to stomp temptation. Swing wide heaven’s gates, that I may enter Your joy. Amen.

 

 

Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009), 1977.

1 Corinthians 15:35–49 (ESV)

The Resurrection Body

35 But someone will ask, “How are the dead raised? With what kind of body do they come?” 36 You foolish person! What you sow does not come to life unless it dies. 37 And what you sow is not the body that is to be, but a bare kernel, perhaps of wheat or of some other grain. 38 But God gives it a body as he has chosen, and to each kind of seed its own body. 39 For not all flesh is the same, but there is one kind for humans, another for animals, another for birds, and another for fish. 40 There are heavenly bodies and earthly bodies, but the glory of the heavenly is of one kind, and the glory of the earthly is of another. 41 There is one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars; for star differs from star in glory. 

42 So is it with the resurrection of the dead. What is sown is perishable; what is raised is imperishable. 43 It is sown in dishonor; it is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness; it is raised in power. 44 It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. If there is a natural body, there is also a spiritual body. 45 Thus it is written, “The first man Adam became a living being”; the last Adam became a life-giving spirit. 46 But it is not the spiritual that is first but the natural, and then the spiritual. 47 The first man was from the earth, a man of dust; the second man is from heaven. 48 As was the man of dust, so also are those who are of the dust, and as is the man of heaven, so also are those who are of heaven. 49 Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven.

 

The body—corrupted by sin—declines, decays, and dies. Humanly speaking, we can extend our lives only by having children, whom we likewise corrupt with our inherited sin. But thanks be to God! He chose to establish a new order for us through Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection. Jesus resisted all corruption and grants us His heavenly life.

 

I pray: Jesus, lead me to respect my body and to regard my funeral like a farmer sowing with resurrection hope. By Your grace, may I and my loved ones reap a harvest of heavenly life. Amen.

 

 

Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009), 1976.

Latest comments

09.10 | 11:35

I really love v.13 in this passage. It is both encouraging and comforting.

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24.01 | 10:13

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13.12 | 15:29

HI this is I Frederick Demond Wilson. I hereby am solemnly here to forebare witnessing of His witness, our Creator.

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27.05 | 16:27

Pastor: on my e mails, a note said that you were trying to contact me. Now,
I am having trouble reaching you. Was it important? In Christ, daisy

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